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Thomas Earl Part III: Artist Extraordinaire

When it comes to bold and vivid graphic design in colonial America, the copybook created by New Jersey schoolmaster Thomas Earl in 1740 and 1741 is without precedent. Earl’s pages are simply brighter and more exuberant than anyone else’s work.

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Thomas Earl Part I: Schoolmaster, America

Thomas Earl’s two handwritten manuscripts are replete with lessons in arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, navigation, and astronomy, which he enriched with calligraphic flourishes and stunning watercolor. The books not only served as essential teaching tools, but the second book in particular is tangible proof of his qualifications to teach.

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Tributes in Paper from the City of Brotherly Love

In the early nineteenth century, a master practitioner of the art of paper cutting in the city of Philadelphia made a technically unparalleled series of cutworks. In each example, the paper was cut such that its overall effect is comparable to the finest lace work. As Pennsylvania scholar Lisa Minardi has keenly observed: “this [intricacy] involves not just cutting out of designs but also slitting of the paper and/or pinpricking to create texture and add to the overall incredibly delicate effect.”